Gas-Loaded Heat Pipe

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[[Image:HPfig12.png|center|thumb|400 px|alt=Operation of a gas-loaded variable conductance heat pipe.|<center>'''Figure 1: Operation of a gas-loaded variable conductance heat pipe.'''</center>]]
[[Image:HPfig12.png|center|thumb|400 px|alt=Operation of a gas-loaded variable conductance heat pipe.|<center>'''Figure 1: Operation of a gas-loaded variable conductance heat pipe.'''</center>]]
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Gas-loaded heat pipes are one type of variable conductance heat pipes <ref name="FR2012">Faghri, A., 2012, "Review and Advances in Heat Pipe Science and Technology", Journal of Heat Transfer, 134(12), 123001, 1-18.</ref><ref name="Faghri1995">Faghri, A., 1995, Heat Pipe Science and Technology, 1st ed., Taylor & Francis, Washington, D.C.</ref>. The gas-loaded heat pipe, shown in Fig. 1, is the same as the capillary-driven heat pipe or the two-phase thermosyphon except that a noncondensing gas is introduced into the vapor space. During operation, this gas is swept down the length of the heat pipe by the working fluid vapor to the condenser section. Since condensation of the working fluid does not take place where the noncondensing gas is present, a portion of the condenser is blocked from transferring heat to the heat sink (Fig. 12(a)). If the heat input to the evaporator section is increased, the vapor and gas temperatures both increase, which leads to the compression of the inert gas. This in turn increases the amount of condenser surface area available to transfer heat (Fig. 12(b)). This phenomenon results in the gas-loaded heat pipe being able to maintain a nearly constant evaporator temperature regardless of the heat input. Gas-loaded heat pipes have been used in the annular arrangement previously mentioned for an isothermal furnace and for electronic cooling.
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Gas-loaded heat pipes are one type of variable conductance heat pipes <ref name="FR2012">Faghri, A., 2012, "Review and Advances in Heat Pipe Science and Technology," Journal of Heat Transfer, 134(12), 123001. http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/1.4007407</ref><ref name="Faghri1995">Faghri, A., 1995, Heat Pipe Science and Technology, 1st ed., Taylor & Francis, Washington, D.C.</ref>. The gas-loaded heat pipe, shown in Fig. 1, is the same as the capillary-driven heat pipe or the two-phase thermosyphon except that a noncondensing gas is introduced into the vapor space. During operation, this gas is swept down the length of the heat pipe by the working fluid vapor to the condenser section. Since condensation of the working fluid does not take place where the noncondensing gas is present, a portion of the condenser is blocked from transferring heat to the heat sink (Fig. 12(a)). If the heat input to the evaporator section is increased, the vapor and gas temperatures both increase, which leads to the compression of the inert gas. This in turn increases the amount of condenser surface area available to transfer heat (Fig. 12(b)). This phenomenon results in the gas-loaded heat pipe being able to maintain a nearly constant evaporator temperature regardless of the heat input. Gas-loaded heat pipes have been used in the annular arrangement previously mentioned for an isothermal furnace and for electronic cooling.
==References==
==References==
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Revision as of 00:30, 13 March 2014

 Related Topics Catalog
Types of Heat Pipes
  1. Two-Phase Closed Thermosyphon
  1. Capillary-Driven Heat Pipe
  1. Annular Heat Pipe
  1. Vapor Chamber
  1. Rotating Heat Pipe
  1. Gas-Loaded Heat Pipe
  1. Loop Heat Pipe
  1. Capillary Pumped Loop Heat Pipe
  1. Pulsating Heat Pipe
  1. Monogroove Heat Pipe
  1. Micro and Miniature Heat Pipes
  1. Inverted Meniscus Heat Pipe
  1. Nonconventional Heat Pipes
Operation of a gas-loaded variable conductance heat pipe.
Figure 1: Operation of a gas-loaded variable conductance heat pipe.

Gas-loaded heat pipes are one type of variable conductance heat pipes [1][2]. The gas-loaded heat pipe, shown in Fig. 1, is the same as the capillary-driven heat pipe or the two-phase thermosyphon except that a noncondensing gas is introduced into the vapor space. During operation, this gas is swept down the length of the heat pipe by the working fluid vapor to the condenser section. Since condensation of the working fluid does not take place where the noncondensing gas is present, a portion of the condenser is blocked from transferring heat to the heat sink (Fig. 12(a)). If the heat input to the evaporator section is increased, the vapor and gas temperatures both increase, which leads to the compression of the inert gas. This in turn increases the amount of condenser surface area available to transfer heat (Fig. 12(b)). This phenomenon results in the gas-loaded heat pipe being able to maintain a nearly constant evaporator temperature regardless of the heat input. Gas-loaded heat pipes have been used in the annular arrangement previously mentioned for an isothermal furnace and for electronic cooling.

References

  1. Faghri, A., 2012, "Review and Advances in Heat Pipe Science and Technology," Journal of Heat Transfer, 134(12), 123001. http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/1.4007407
  2. Faghri, A., 1995, Heat Pipe Science and Technology, 1st ed., Taylor & Francis, Washington, D.C.