Finding Resources

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Finding Resources
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Short of drilling directly into the hydrothermal reservoir, chemical geothermometry is perhaps the best tool for surface exploration of deep geothermal resources. The concentrations of the many minerals dissolved in underground reservoirs are highly temperature dependent. The temperature of an underground geothermal reservoir can therefore be estimated by measuring of chemical composition of various minerals in the hot spring water. The ratios of concentration of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and lithium, as well as the isotopes of individual atoms are commonly used as indicators for viability of the subsurface reservoir for geothermal exploitation.
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==References==
==References==

Revision as of 00:22, 29 June 2010

Finding Resources Short of drilling directly into the hydrothermal reservoir, chemical geothermometry is perhaps the best tool for surface exploration of deep geothermal resources. The concentrations of the many minerals dissolved in underground reservoirs are highly temperature dependent. The temperature of an underground geothermal reservoir can therefore be estimated by measuring of chemical composition of various minerals in the hot spring water. The ratios of concentration of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and lithium, as well as the isotopes of individual atoms are commonly used as indicators for viability of the subsurface reservoir for geothermal exploitation.

References

Further Reading

External Links