Binding Energy

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Binding Energy
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The binding energy of a nucleus is a measure of how tightly its protons and neutrons are held together by nuclear forces. The binding energy per nucleon, the energy required to remove a neutron or a proton from a
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Figure 11-2
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Every atom consists of a nucleus surrounded by electrons.
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electronneutronproton
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Atoms: The Facts
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Did You Know That ...?
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• A row of 100 million atoms of hydrogen would only be about one centimeter long.
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• Eight of the elements known to us make up 98.5 % of the earth’s crust by weight: oxygen makes up 46.6%, silicon 27.7%, and aluminum 8%, with Fe, Ca, Na, K, and Mg composing the rest.
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• Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe.
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• Of 92 naturally occurring elements, 76 are solids, 11 are gases, and 5 are liquids at room temperature.
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• Nearly all of the mass of an atom is contained in the nucleus, which has a density of around 100 million tons per cubic centimeter.
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Figure 11-3
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Uranium-235
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UAtomicMass NeutronNumberAtomicNumber2359214323892( U)
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245
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Chapter 11 - Nuclear energy
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nucleus, varies with mass number and is shown in Figure 11-4. The figure implies that when a heavy nucleus (such as that of uranium) splits or two light nuclei (such as the nuclei of deuterium and tritium) coalesce, more stable nuclei form and energy is released. The former example describes fission, while the latter represents the basic mechanism that occurs in fusion reactions.
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==References==
==References==

Revision as of 17:43, 30 June 2010

Binding Energy The binding energy of a nucleus is a measure of how tightly its protons and neutrons are held together by nuclear forces. The binding energy per nucleon, the energy required to remove a neutron or a proton from a Figure 11-2 Every atom consists of a nucleus surrounded by electrons. electronneutronproton Atoms: The Facts Did You Know That ...? • A row of 100 million atoms of hydrogen would only be about one centimeter long. • Eight of the elements known to us make up 98.5 % of the earth’s crust by weight: oxygen makes up 46.6%, silicon 27.7%, and aluminum 8%, with Fe, Ca, Na, K, and Mg composing the rest. • Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. • Of 92 naturally occurring elements, 76 are solids, 11 are gases, and 5 are liquids at room temperature. • Nearly all of the mass of an atom is contained in the nucleus, which has a density of around 100 million tons per cubic centimeter. Figure 11-3 Uranium-235 UAtomicMass NeutronNumberAtomicNumber2359214323892( U) 245 Chapter 11 - Nuclear energy nucleus, varies with mass number and is shown in Figure 11-4. The figure implies that when a heavy nucleus (such as that of uranium) splits or two light nuclei (such as the nuclei of deuterium and tritium) coalesce, more stable nuclei form and energy is released. The former example describes fission, while the latter represents the basic mechanism that occurs in fusion reactions.

References

Further Reading

External Links